Sep 182012
 

For the first time in over a decade a lot of homeowners have mentioned that their sump pump has stopped running on a regular basis. Hard to believe, but it is true that the water table has subsided and homeowners who had pumps that cycled steadily have dried up. This is also a signal that your foundation may be settling . Please click on the below link to read an article about looking for new cracks and movement in your foundation.

The Daily Reporter, 9-5-12, Fault Lines: Foundation Repair Companies Blame Drought for Increase in Basement Cracks

This is also an opportunity to remove and clean your drainage sump basin and pump. Yes, if you are mechanical, you can remove your pump from the sump basin and take an empty coffee can or shop vac and collect the silt, rock and construction debris that has settled in your basin over time.

While the pump is out, it would be a good idea to inspect and remove any stones or sticks that may be in the intake. Hose off any mud that may have built up on the pump. Inspect the check valve too; that is a wear item that can easily be replaced. Consider replacing it with a new silent check valve.

Reinstall your pump the same way it came out. Check your owners manual for other details. Use a garden hose or a large bucket of water to carefully fill your sump basin and activate the pump several times. Job Complete!

If you have a sump basin that is relatively clean, I would suggest adding water as mentioned above and allowing your pump to cycle several times. Exercising your sump pump during dry weather is always a good idea.